Vocational Trade Schools in Wisconsin

Why Choose Trade School?

Trade schools in Wisconsin provide career-focused training in areas like allied healthcare, the skilled trades, and technology. Potential jobs for trade school graduates include medical assistant, electrician, paralegal, cosmetologist, and paramedic.

During a vocational program, students take classes and gain hands-on training in their field. Students in paramedic studies programs, for example, practice their skills in an ambulance or hospital setting, while dental hygienists complete clinical and laboratory requirements. Many trade and vocational schools offer self-paced, accelerated, or online options, which appeal to students balancing school with work or family responsibilities.


Vocational programs offer several benefits over four-year academic programs. Earning a vocational certificate or degree generally takes 1-2 years, meaning students can graduate and enter the workforce faster than students in four-year programs. As a result, trade school students often save money on their credential compared to a four-year degree. Professionals with an occupational credential also benefit from a higher employment rate than those with an academic credential, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

Our list ranks the top vocational schools in Wisconsin to help prospective students find the best fit for their needs. This page also provides career and salary data for various trade school occupations as well as scholarship opportunities for trade school students.

FAQ

Question Answer
What is the difference between a trade school and a college? Trade schools provide career-focused training in specific areas, such as allied health and the skilled trades. Colleges typically emphasize academic programs.
What can you learn at a trade school? Trade school students can train for careers in areas like emergency services, the skilled trades, and legal services. Trade schools also offer programs in fields like culinary arts, cosmetology, and technology.
What are examples of vocational jobs? Vocational jobs include medical assistant, dental hygienist, occupational therapy assistant, mechanic, and plumber.
What are the different types of trade schools? Trade schools offer vocational programs in areas like allied health, beauty and cosmetology, the skilled trades, and the culinary arts.

Accreditation and Licensing for Trade Schools

Prospective trade school students should always check a school's accreditation and licensing status before applying. Accredited schools meet high standards for educating students. To earn accreditation, schools must undergo an extensive review from an independent accrediting agency. During the review, the accrediting agency evaluates the school's student learning outcomes, academic mission, and faculty qualifications. Schools that earn accreditation must regularly repeat the review process to maintain their status. 

Students benefit from accreditation in several ways. For example, only students at accredited schools qualify for federal financial aid, and many schools only accept degrees and transfer credits from accredited institutions. Additionally, many professional licenses and certifications require an accredited degree. 

Many types of schools offer vocational certificates and degrees. These schools may hold regional or national accreditation. Community colleges and four-year universities typically pursue regional accreditation. In Wisconsin, the Higher Learning Commission grants regional accreditation to schools.

Vocational and trade schools generally pursue national accreditation from a specialized agency like the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges, which grants accreditation to over 650 trade and technical schools nationwide. Other accrediting agencies include the Distance Education Accrediting Commission, which evaluates online schools. Students can learn more about the accreditation process here.

In addition to accreditation, postsecondary schools also need a license from the state. The State of Wisconsin Educational Approval Program provides a list of licensed schools.

Vocational Trade Schools in Wisconsin

Vocational and Trade Schools

Trade and vocational schools in Wisconsin blend classroom and experiential training to prepare graduates for in-demand careers. By choosing a top-ranked vocational program, professionals can advance their education and increase their earning potential. Our list ranks the best vocational schools in Wisconsin to help students find the right fit for their needs.

Rank Logo School Tuition # of Online Programs Acceptance Rate Graduation Rate Financial Aid Credit For Experience Placement Service Counseling Services Description & Additional Information Toggle
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1 Northcentral Technical College Wausau, WI Tuition $9,073 # of Online Programs 25 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 36% Financial Aid - Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

For more than 100 years, Northcentral Technical College has educated and trained workers in central Wisconsin. The school offers 190 programs that include two-year associate degrees and one- and two-year technical diplomas. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college use NTC's liberal arts transfer program, an associate degree that requires 60-70 credits. The transfer program's pre-major disciplines include business, economics, and health and science.

Learners seeking to enter the workplace right out of college choose from an extensive catalog offered by one of the top trade schools in Wisconsin. Options include the AAS in dental hygienist, AAS in manufacturing engineering technology, and an associate degree in IT with six tracks. Students attending local high schools begin their college education through NTC's dual-enrollment program.

Another option for high school juniors and seniors, a two-year youth apprenticeship program, integrates academic and technical instruction with at least 450 hours of paid, on-the-job learning. Students can also engage in apprenticeship training in fields such as industrial electrician, software development, and machining.

2 Western Technical College La Crosse, WI Tuition $8,876 # of Online Programs 24 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 33% Financial Aid 16% Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

Western Technical College provides students with the essential training needed to begin or advance careers in one of several disciplines. Western's degrees either provide the academic background for the first two years of college or focus exclusively on skill development. The 100 programs include two-year degrees in accounting, architectural technology, criminal justice, and building construction and cabinetmaking.

With as few as 12 credits, students can earn a certificate in desktop publishing or another specialization. Alternatively, in less than a year students earn a technical diploma as early childhood professionals. Other technical diplomas include basic welding and diesel and heavy equipment technician. Many of the certificates and diplomas can transfer to associate degrees, giving learners a pathway to a two-year degree at one of the best technical schools in Wisconsin.

Western's apprenticeships ensure that participants leave the program with in-demand skills in fields such as plumbing and machining. Support services include peer tutoring and YWCA childcare services.

3 Northeast Wisconsin Technical College Green Bay, WI Tuition $9,452 # of Online Programs 32 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 44% Financial Aid 8% Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

Founded in 1912, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College enrolls about 27,000 students each year. The Green Bay college delivers more than 200 academic and technical programs on three campuses and at five regional centers. The degrees, diplomas, and certificates fall into 13 clusters, including IT, business, architecture and construction, and health sciences. Cutting-edge associate degrees cultivate workers for fields such as solar energy, gerontology, and nuclear technology.

The general studies transfer certificate consists of 31-33 credits of core courses, and it qualifies transfers to enter UW-Green Bay or UW-Oshkosh as a sophomore. One of the best vocational schools in Wisconsin, NWTC ensures that all associate degrees transfer to at least one, four-year institution. The school accomplishes this through arrangements with more than 40, four-year colleges across the region. NWTC manages a strong apprenticeship programs in fields such as masonry and plumbing.

4 Moraine Park Technical College Fond du Lac, WI Tuition $9,396 # of Online Programs 27 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 35% Financial Aid 14% Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

Moraine Park Technical College provides an entryway to more than 100 careers. Students study on campuses in Fond du Lac, Beaver Dam, West Bend, and through the school's virtual campus. In two years, students earn degrees in fields like business management, nursing, and criminal justice. MPTC's strong IT program offers an associate degree with multiple tracks. Certificate programs include CNC set-up/operator, healthcare leadership, and early childhood administrative credentials.

Many programs offer online learning, making MPTC one of the best trade schools in Wisconsin for virtual learning. Notable MPTC on-campus programs include boot camps in robotic welding and production assembly. Apprenticeships give learners hands-on training in fields such as carpentry and cosmetology.

Some MPTC credits transfer to University of Wisconsin colleges and other institutions. Affordable tuition and MPTC foundation scholarships ensure learners graduate with less debt than their four-year counterparts.

5 Milwaukee Area Technical College Milwaukee, WI Tuition $7,183 # of Online Programs 38 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 13% Financial Aid - Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

At Milwaukee Area Technical College, 34,000 students enroll in 170 programs, with 90% enrolling part time. Students learn on one of four campuses, including downtown Milwaukee. They choose from two-year degrees and short-term technical diplomas and certificates. MATC programs fall into seven academic and career pathways, including healthcare and STEM fields. The school's top five programs based on enrollment include nursing, dental hygiene, and a four-year transfer degree.

Students interested in paid training can choose one of 14 apprenticeships. Online learning gives students a flexible option to earn credentials at one of the best trade schools in Wisconsin. Students achieve their goals with academic assistance such as tutoring at the math, writing, and science centers. Online tutoring accommodates the needs of those unable to attend in person. MATC facilitates a seamless transfer to a program at one of 35, four-year college partners. Through MATC Promise, eligible students earn free tuition. The school reports that 90% of graduates find employment within six months.

6 Gateway Technical College Kenosha, WI Tuition $7,311 # of Online Programs 28 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 23% Financial Aid - Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

Gateway Technical College was the nation's first publicly funded technical college. Gateway serves students on nine campuses and centers in Racine, Kenosha, and Walworth counties. About 21,000 learners enroll in the college's 70 training programs. Majors include criminal justice studies, business management, and IT with several specializations.

Learners interested in technical degrees choose from a robust selection that includes automotive technology and electronics. A unique urban farming certificate combines technical and entrepreneurship skills so participants can effectively cultivate profitable urban gardens.

Other short-term options include the 34-credit small business entrepreneurship technical diploma, which students can earn online.

Employers and Gateway partner to develop the workforce through apprenticeships. One of the best trade schools in Wisconsin for on-the-job training, Gateway offers apprenticeships in the service, construction, and industrial trades. The school's low-cost tuition and payment options help students afford their education.

7 Mid-State Technical College Wisconsin Rapids, WI Tuition $9,224 # of Online Programs 18 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 25% Financial Aid 12% Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

Part of a 16-school technical college system, Mid-State Technical College operates campuses in Marshfield, Adams, Stevens Point, and Wisconsin Rapids. The college focuses on high-demand fields in the region, preparing learners for well-paying jobs. Students learn in state-of-the-art classrooms from faculty with industry experience.

Mid-State's 60 hands-on programs lead to associate degrees, diplomas, and certificates. The programs cover sectors such as health sciences, architecture and construction, and business and administration. Students interested in honing technical skills choose from several degrees and short-term credentials. Options include welding, electrical power engineering, and automotive technology. One of the best Wisconsin technical colleges for transfer students, Mid-State offers the university transfer liberal arts program leading to an AA or AS.

Mid-State apprenticeships offer paid training and an entrypoint into a career such as plumbing or IT development. Comprehensive support services such as tutoring and career services help learners achieve their goals. The school reports that 94% of graduates find employment within six months of graduation.

8 Lakeshore Technical College Cleveland, WI Tuition $9,337 # of Online Programs 24 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 39% Financial Aid 19% Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

Lakeshore Technical College is one of the best trade schools in Wisconsin for career programs and customized training. About 10,000 students attend the institution each year, taking classes on the main campus in Cleveland, at learning centers, and community education locations. About 70, two-year and one-year programs empower learners with career skills in several fields.

Traditional career paths lead to degrees in fields such as accounting, manufacturing management, nursing, and culinary arts. Some of the school's recent additions include the ophthalmic medical assistant diploma and nuclear technician associate degree. Technical options include associate degrees in dairy herd management and auto collision repair and refinishing. Enrollees complete apprenticeships in 11 construction and industrial career areas.

Students who want to create their own degree find the individualized technical studies associate degree a complementary option. Since learners receive credit for work and educational experiences, the completion time frame varies. About 1,000 students use LTC to fill in gaps in their basic education.

9 Southwest Wisconsin Technical College Fennimore, WI Tuition $9,295 # of Online Programs 17 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 56% Financial Aid 17% Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

Located in Fennimore, Southwest Wisconsin Technical College administers programs in 15 career clusters. Students receive training in fields such as IT, agronomy, the building trades, and patient care. Southwest Tech's university transfer - liberal arts degree transfers to public and private colleges in Wisconsin and elsewhere. Learners can seamlessly transfer other programs to Southwest Tech's partner institutions, including Bellevue University and Cardinal Stritch University.

The school's apprenticeships train electricians, plumbers, and mechatronics technicians. Learners who complete a registered apprenticeship can return to college to earn the 60-credit journeyworker AAS, which provides academic recognition for their technical expertise. Instructors use eight- and 16-week formats to deliver fully online degrees and other programs.

Learners can access needed support services such as tutoring, mental health counseling, and financial resource management online.

One of the best vocational schools in Wisconsin for affordability, Southwest Tech offers grants and scholarships to help reduce education costs.

10 Fox Valley Technical College Appleton, WI Tuition $9,969 # of Online Programs 31 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 38% Financial Aid 12% Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

Founded more than 100 years ago, Fox Valley Technical College focuses on high-tech occupational training to address the needs of an evolving workplace. The school's more than 200 programs focus on health sciences; engineering technologies; and agriculture, horticulture, and natural resources. The largest cluster of FVTC programs -- business, management, and finance -- includes associate degrees in banking and finance and business management.

Partnering with Lakeshore Technical College, FVTC offers several programs, including the AAS in broadcast captioning and AAS in wind energy technology. Students complete many of these courses at FVTC and others online or in an interactive video classroom.

FVTC's selection of apprenticeships make the college one of the best trade schools in Wisconsin. Besides traditional apprenticeships, such as plumbing and electrician, students can pursue newer FVTC options such as an operating engineer apprenticeship. Learners can fast track their careers with a diploma or certificate earned in less than a year.

11 Blackhawk Technical College Janesville, WI Tuition $7,288 # of Online Programs 19 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 34% Financial Aid 7% Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

Blackhawk Technical College enrolls residents in Rock and Green counties. The school reports that 95% of students find employment within six months of graduation, making the college one of the best vocational schools in Wisconsin. BTC's 65 programs include the academic degrees that learners need for transfer. The catalog also offers vocational programs focused on technical competencies.

Two-year degrees and short-term diplomas and certificates cover 13 career clusters, including IT; business; manufacturing; and science, technology, engineering, and math. Enrollees interested in a more versatile option choose an individualized technical studies associate degree they design with an advisor. This option offers both in-person and online learning formats.

BTC highlights a robust portfolio of degrees that prepare women for non-traditional technical and industrial careers. Nontraditional programs such as electromechanical technology and web software developer typically pay 20-30% more than jobs women traditionally hold. Alternatively, BTC offers many high-tech, well-paying healthcare programs that may interest men.

12 Waukesha County Technical College Pewaukee, WI Tuition $9,620 # of Online Programs 23 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 28% Financial Aid 15% Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

Established in 1923, Waukesha County Technical College enrolls 20,000 students each year. About half of enrollees pursue the AAS, which specializes in the technical and work experience students need to enter the workplace. One of the best trade schools in Wisconsin, WCTC offers AAS degrees in business management, baking and pastry management, and architectural drafting/construction technology. The IT AAS allows learners to choose from five specializations.

WCTC's dual degrees, such as cybersecurity specialist and network specialist, allow learners to earn two degrees in three years. Those interested in short-term options choose diplomas and certificates in fields as diverse as accounting, EMT, and automotive basics. Apprenticeships allow learners to earn while they learn in IT, construction, and manufacturing. Employers also partner with WCTC to offer internships at 240 businesses. Learning occurs in state-of-the-art WCTC facilities. Students use peer tutoring in technical courses and academic support from instructors to sharpen their knowledge.

13 Madison Area Technical College Madison, WI Tuition $9,679 # of Online Programs Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate - Financial Aid - Credit For Experience - Placement Service - Counseling Services -

Madison Area Technical College is a leader in workforce training and the top pipeline for transfer students to UW-Madison. In addition to the main Madison campus, MATC students learn on campuses in Portage, Fort Atkinson, Reedsburg, Watertown, and online. Learners can choose from 180 programs in 11 study areas. The programs culminate in two-year associate degrees and short-term diplomas and certificates.

Students earn credentials in various technical fields, including IT; architecture and engineering; transportation; and construction, manufacturing, and maintenance. Attendees interested in a four-year academic pathway choose the on-campus or hybrid liberal arts transfer degree. This option offers several specialized tracks, including engineering and arts and humanities.

Learners receive hands-on training at one one of the best technical schools in Wisconsin for apprenticeships. The 16 options include machining, cosmetology, and tool and die apprenticeships. Students interested in building skills fast complete technical diplomas requiring as little as a semester.

14 Chippewa Valley Technical College Eau Claire, WI Tuition $9,307 # of Online Programs 27 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 30% Financial Aid 2% Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

Chippewa Valley Technical College serves an 11-county area with 12 locations. CVTC offers 110 programs, including 35 certificates that students complete in an accelerated time frame. Learners interested in earning their first degree choose an associate in a traditional field such as criminal justice or early childhood education -- or a technical field such as automotive technology or dental hygienist.

Online programs include the AS in liberal arts, which serves as the first two years of a bachelor's degree at UW-Eau Claire, UW-River Falls, and UW-Stout. Learners can also explore 13 apprenticeships that teach in-demand skills in traditional fields such as construction and plumbing. Newer two-year apprenticeships train data analysts and software developers.

Diplomas in various fields help cement CVTC's standing as one of the best trade schools in Wisconsin for short-term training. A vibrant social life awaits learners thanks to CVTC's 30 clubs and organizations and many campus events.

15 Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College Shell Lake, WI Tuition $9,968 # of Online Programs 19 Acceptance Rate - Graduation Rate 50% Financial Aid 8% Credit For Experience Yes Placement Service Yes Counseling Services Yes

Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College opened in 1912 and continues a mission to train a dynamic workforce. The Rice Lake-based school offers two-year degrees and earn-as-you-learn apprenticeships. Students choose technical degrees in notable majors such as automation for industrial systems and marine repair technician.

Learners interested in allied health pursue degrees in nursing, paramedic technician, and medical administrative professional. The unique gerontology-aging services professional program trains workers skilled in dealing with an aging population. The AA and AS university transfer degrees provide learners with the first two years of their bachelor's degree. Diplomas fall midway between two-year degrees and certificates, giving students the option to develop skills in a field such as accounting in just one year.

WITC offers certificates not always available at technical schools in Wisconsin. These include dementia care pathway and business graphics certificates. Apprenticeships in six areas, including plumbing and cosmetology, simultaneously give learners money and skills.

Find Vocational and Trade Schools in Wisconsin

Nearly 50 private career colleges, public vocational schools, and community colleges serve the vocational training needs of Wisconsin's postsecondary student population. Students can use the search tool below to find the right school for their needs.

State
Degree Level
School Type
Environment

Career and Salary Outlook for Trade School Graduates

Many trade school careers offer above-average salaries and strong demand. For example, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects much faster-than-average job growth for dental hygienists, paralegals, and HVAC technicians between 2018 and 2028. 

The salary outlook for trade school graduates varies by factors like industry and role. On average, trade school occupations pay around $55,000 per year. Some fields, like personal care, pay below-average salaries, while others, like management occupations, pay over $96,000 per year, on average.

Location also affects potential salary. Wisconsin salary data shows that respiratory therapists in the state make over $64,000 per year, while radiology technicians earn more than $60,000 per year, on average. 

Prospective trade school students should research the earning potential and job growth in their specific field.

What Kinds of Trade School Programs Are Available?

Trade schools in Wisconsin prepare students for careers in healthcare, the skilled trades, technology, and other high-demand fields. This section introduces some popular trade school programs in Wisconsin. In addition to these programs, prospective students can research opportunities in areas like emergency services, cosmetology, and engineering technology.

Dental Hygienist Schools

Dental hygienists educate patients about oral health and conduct examinations to protect teeth. They look for signs of oral disease, apply protective treatments like fluoride, and take dental x-rays. Dental hygienists also report their findings to dentists. 

A dental hygiene associate program prepares students for this career. During the program, students take courses in areas like anatomy, periodontics, and oral hygiene. Programs also incorporate clinical training to strengthen patient care skills.

After completing the degree, dental hygienists must apply for a license. In Wisconsin, the Department of Safety and Professional Services licenses dental hygienists. The BLS reports that dental hygienists earned a median annual pay of $76,220 in 2019, with much faster-than-average projected job growth between 2018 and 2028.

Learn more about dental hygienist programs.

Mechanic Schools

Mechanics, also called automotive service technicians, inspect and repair vehicles. They identify problems, repair or replace defective parts, and explain automotive problems to clients. Mechanics also perform basic care and maintenance to make sure cars run smoothly.

Vocational schools in Wisconsin offer automotive service technology certificate and degree programs to train students for this career. During these programs, learners study topics like engine repair, brake maintenance, and other automotive service techniques. Students also complete laboratory or practicum requirements to build hands-on skills.

Mechanics can pursue professional certification from an organization like the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence, which offers specialty credentials in areas such as engine performance, brakes, and electronic systems. BLS data shows that mechanics earned a median annual pay of $42,090 in 2019.

Learn more about mechanic programs.

Paralegal Schools

Paralegals help lawyers prepare for trial and conduct legal business. They may investigate the facts of a case, conduct research on relevant laws, and draft legal documents like contracts. Paralegals can also file briefs and appeals with the court. Many paralegals specialize in an area like corporate law or litigation.

Paralegal studies certificate and degree programs train students for this career. During the program, learners complete coursework on topics like legal research, contract law, and corporate law. 

Paralegals and legal assistants made a median annual salary of nearly $52,000 in 2019, with much faster-than-average projected job growth between 2018 and 2028.

Learn more about paralegal studies programs.

Radiology Technician School

Radiology technicians use medical equipment to create diagnostic images, such as x-rays. They prepare patients for procedures, position patients and equipment to capture images, and evaluate images with a physician. Radiology technicians must follow safety procedures to protect patients. 

An associate degree in radiologic technology prepares graduates for this career. During the program, students take classes in areas like patient care, radiation physics, and image evaluation. Students also complete clinical requirements. 

In every state, radiology technicians need a license. The Department of Safety and Professional Services grants radiology technician licenses in Wisconsin. These professionals can also pursue certification through he American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Radiology technicians earned a median annual pay of over $62,280 in 2019, with faster-than-average projected job growth between 2018 and 2028.

Learn more about radiology technician programs.

Financial Aid for Trade School Students

Choosing an affordable trade school can help students save money on their education. Wisconsin's public universities charge around $8,500 per year in tuition and fees, on average, while private universities cost over $33,000 per year. In contrast, Wisconsin community colleges charge under $4,500 per year, on average, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

Trade school students can also apply for financial aid to help lower the costs of their education, such as loans, scholarships, and grants. Students can qualify for federal financial aid by submitting the FAFSA every year. However, only students at accredited institutions can receive federal aid. 

Unlike loans, grants and scholarships do not require repayment, making them ideal forms of financial aid. The next section introduces some scholarship opportunities for trade school students.

Scholarship for Trade School Students

Students attending vocational and trade schools in Wisconsin qualify for many scholarship opportunities. The state government, private foundations, and professional organizations all award scholarships and grants to trade school students. In addition to the following opportunities, learners can find scholarships based on their field or school.

Wisconsin Grant

Who Can Apply: Administered by the state, the Wisconsin Grant funds Wisconsin residents enrolled in a degree or certificate program at a public institution, including Wisconsin Technical College.
Amount: Up to $3,150

Apply for Scholarship
Technical Excellence Scholarship

Who Can Apply: This scholarship funds Wisconsin students who demonstrate high proficiency in technical subjects. Recipients must use the award within the Wisconsin Technical College System.
Amount: Up to $2,250

Apply for Scholarship
Community Foundation of North Central Wisconsin Scholarships

Who Can Apply: The Community Foundation of North Central Wisconsin administers 125 endowed scholarships for college students, including scholarships for students at tech schools in Wisconsin.
Amount: Varies

Apply for Scholarship
GLHF Scholarships

Who Can Apply: The Great Lakes Hemophilia Foundation offers several scholarships for students with bleeding disorders. The education scholarship, for example, provides up to $3,000 for students to attend an accredited college or vocational school.
Amount: $200-$5,000

Apply for Scholarship
Wisconsin Restaurant Association Scholarships

Who Can Apply: The WRA Education Foundation offers scholarships to Wisconsin residents pursuing postsecondary education in fields related to the restaurant industry. Recipients must attend an accredited institution.
Amount: Varies

Apply for Scholarship

Additional Education and Career Resources

Associated Builders and Contractors - Wisconsin

The Wisconsin chapter of the professional organization for builders and contractors. Provides resources for membership, job safety and education and training opportunities like apprenticeships and field training.

Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction: Career & Technical Education

Learn about Wisconsin's vocational and trade programs in agriculture, business, consumer services, healthcare information technology, and engineering.

Wisconsin DECA

The DECA program mentors Wisconsin students in marketing, management, hospitality, and entrepreneurship. It hosts a career conference and partners with the greater business community.

Wisconsin Nurses Association

Comprehensive resource for nurses in Wisconsin to attend events, find continuing education requirements and learn about state licensure.

Wisconsin Job Network

Launched in 1994, the Network rounds up job listings from many of the leading employers in Wisconsin and provides advanced search options. The site includes career tips and internship listings.

Learn More...

Trade and Vocational Schools