Top Nursing Schools in Texas

Score Tuition Student/Teacher ratio Program count Graduation Rate
1 Lee College 93.00 13:1 10 24%
2 Kilgore College 89.25 17:1 10 19%
3 Galveston College 89.00 15:1 10 23%
4 Alvin Community College 88.00 17:1 1 16%
5 Panola College 88.00 18:1 1 20%
6 College of the Mainland 86.75 14:1 10 18%
7 Paris Junior College 86.00 22:1 1 23%
8 Grayson College 85.50 18:1 10 19%
9 Navarro College 85.50 17:1 10 19%
10 Howard College 84.50 15:1 10 21%
11 Clarendon College 84.00 18:1 10 30%
12 Texas State Technical College-West Texas 83.25 13:1 10 31%
13 Odessa College 83.00 17:1 10 30%
14 Lone Star College 82.75 18:1 1 10%
15 San Jacinto College 82.25 19:1 10 15%
16 Vernon College 82.00 16:1 10 30%
17 Southwest Texas Junior College 81.00 22:1 10 25%
18 Angelina College 80.50 15:1 10 14%
19 Northwest Vista College 79.75 22:1 10 21%
20 Hill College 79.75 20:1 10 20%
21 St Philip’s College 79.50 15:1 10 10%
22 McLennan Community College 79.50 17:1 1 18%
23 Texarkana College 79.25 21:1 10 18%
24 Trinity Valley Community College 79.00 20:1 10 20%
25 Palo Alto College 78.00 20:1 10 16%
26 Northeast Texas Community College 77.25 20:1 10 20%
27 Collin College 77.00 26:1 1 11%
28 Southwest Collegiate Institute for the Deaf 76.75 9:1 10 8%
29 Wharton County Junior College 76.50 20:1 10 18%
30 El Centro College 76.50 20:1 1 6%
31 Victoria College 76.25 13:1 10 12%
32 North Central Texas College 76.00 25:1 10 14%
33 Amarillo College 75.75 22:1 10 16%
34 San Antonio College 75.75 19:1 10 11%
35 Houston Community College 75.75 22:1 10 12%
36 Weatherford College 75.00 18:1 10 15%
37 Tarrant County College District 74.50 25:1 10 10%
38 Lamar State College-Port Arthur 74.50 17:1 10 17%
39 Del Mar College 74.25 14:1 10 8%
40 Central Texas College 74.25 18:1 10 8%
41 Temple College 74.00 17:1 10 7%
42 Tyler Junior College 73.25 21:1 10 17%
Score Tuition Student/Teacher ratio Program count Graduation Rate
1 Hardin-Simmons University 88.50 12:1 8 52%
2 Texas Christian University 87.50 13:1 2 75%
3 Midwestern State University 87.25 17:1 10 45%
4 Texas Woman’s University 86.00 19:1 1 44%
5 The University of Texas at Austin 86.00 17:1 16 81%
6 The University of Texas at Tyler 85.25 21:1 6 45%
7 Baylor University 85.25 15:1 7 72%
8 The University of Texas at El Paso 84.00 20:1 2 38%
9 University of Mary Hardin-Baylor 83.75 17:1 10 48%
10 Tarleton State University 83.50 19:1 26 45%
11 University of the Incarnate Word 83.25 14:1 10 43%
12 The University of Texas-Pan American 83.00 22:1 16 43%
13 Texas A & M International University 82.75 21:1 23 45%
14 Angelo State University 82.75 19:1 2 30%
15 Lubbock Christian University 82.75 12:1 23 43%
16 Texas A & M University-Texarkana 82.25 15:1 16 N/A
17 Wayland Baptist University 82.00 10:1 16 32%
18 West Texas A & M University 81.75 20:1 16 40%
19 Sam Houston State University 81.25 21:1 26 53%
20 Prairie View A & M University 81.00 18:1 10 38%
21 Southwestern Adventist University 81.00 12:1 26 40%
22 McMurry University 81.00 10:1 16 36%
23 Brazosport College 80.75 17:1 26 18%
24 Midland College 80.75 17:1 26 20%
25 Texas A & M University-College Station 80.75 20:1 26 79%
26 University of Houston-Victoria 80.50 17:1 16 N/A
27 The University of Texas of the Permian Basin 80.00 18:1 26 34%
28 Schreiner University 80.00 14:1 26 43%
29 The University of Texas at Arlington 79.75 26:1 5 42%
30 Texas Wesleyan University 79.25 15:1 23 40%
31 Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi 79.00 23:1 10 38%
32 Houston Baptist University 79.00 16:1 26 45%
33 The University of Texas at Brownsville 78.75 24:1 10 28%
34 Stephen F Austin State University 78.50 20:1 26 44%
35 Lamar University 78.25 22:1 8 33%
36 East Texas Baptist University 78.25 14:1 26 38%
37 Concordia University-Texas 76.50 11:1 26 32%
38 South Texas College 74.50 27:1 26 18%

Where to Find Nursing Schools in Texas

Prospective nurses in Texas can choose from more than 200 nursing education programs, providing a diverse set of academic offerings at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The search tool below helps students find a program of study that meets their personal and professional goals.

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How to Obtain a Texas Nursing License

In Texas, registered nurses must hold a valid license in order to practice legally. The Texas Board of Nursing is responsible for establishing and regulating licensure requirements, and manages the licensing and renewal processes for registered and advanced practice nurses. Learn more about the licensure requirements for first-time candidates below.

Eligibility Requirements

  • Complete an approved program of nursing at a two- or four-year institution
  • Complete an online examination application and pay a $100 fee
  • Pass a criminal background check through the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Department of Public Safety
  • Register with Pearson VUE at least 30 days before graduation to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) and pay a $200 testing fee
  • Take and pass the Texas Nursing Jurisprudence Examination
  • Graduates of both Texas and out-of-state nursing schools must request an affidavit of graduation be sent to the Board of Nursing by the Dean or Director of their program
  • After receiving the materials listed above, the Board of Nursing will issue an Authorization to Test and students can set a day to take the exam

Keeping a TX License Active

Registered nurses must renew their licenses biannually and show proof of completing at least 20 continuing education credits during the previous two years. Nurses renewing their license for the first time are exempt from the continuing education requirement, but must still pay the standard renewal fee of $60.

TX Licensure Information for APRNs

The Texas Board of Nursing licenses advanced practice registered nurses in a variety of roles, including positions as nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, nurse practitioners, and clinical nurse specialists. Applications are completed online and the Board of Nursing recommends applicants submit all supporting documents at one time. Learn more about the educational requirements and licensing process below:

  • Nurses who graduated on or after January 1, 2003 must complete at least 500 clinical hours in a specialized area of advanced practice during their graduate program of study
  • Pay a fee of $100 for APRN licensure or $150 for a licensure with prescriptive authority
  • Show valid RN licensure in Texas or from a state with compact privilege
  • Graduate from an accredited advanced practice nursing program that is recognized by the Texas Board of Nursing
  • Hold national certification for the specialized area of nursing practice and submit verification of that certification
  • Complete at least 500 hours of clinical practice in an advanced practice role within the last two years (or during the educational program)
  • Complete at least 20 hours of continuing nursing education within the last 24 calendar months

For more detailed information, forms, and updates on advance practice nursing in Texas, go to the Texas Board of Nursing.

Career Numbers: Texas RNs and Beyond

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing reports Texas has nearly 280,000 RNs in the state, a number that includes approximately 17,600 nurse practitioners and other advanced positions. Although the number of nurses is continually growing, the state has one of the highest rates of underserved populations in the country, with the AACN highlighting 315 understaffed regions. These findings coincide with the state experiencing one of the highest rates of growth for nurses in the nation, with a projected increase of 26 percent expected between 2012 and 2022. Those looking to work as a nurse practitioner are expected to see the biggest growth. Learn more about the state’s occupational outlook and earning potential for RNs and APRNs.

Top-Paying Areas for RNs in Texas

Area Hourly Median Wage Annual Median Wage
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown $36.22 $75,340
Dallas-Plano-Irving Metropolitan Division $34.43 $71,620
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington $34.28 $71,300
Fort Worth-Arlington Metropolitan Division $33.96 $70,630
Southern Texas nonmetropolitan area $32.93 $68,500
Brownsville-Harlingen $32.10 $66,770
Killeen-Temple-Fort Hood $31.72 $65,970
San Antonio-New Braunfels $31.55 $65,630
Austin-Round Rock-San Marcos $31.31 $65,130
Corpus Christi $31.06 $64,610

Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014

Texas vs. National Numbers

Salary
  • Texas
  • National
  • Annual Salary (25th percentile)
  • Annual Salary (median)
  • Annual Salary (75th percentile)

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014

Employment
Total Employment (2014)
2022 occupational outlook
Avg. annual openings (2012 – 2022)

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014 and Projections Central

Nursing Resources: TX Edition

Texas Board of Nursing

The Texas Board of Nursing regulates the practice and licensure of nurses in the state by establishing licensing requirements, handling the licensing and renewal process, managing nursing complaints, and establishing nursing compacts with other states.

Texas Emergency Nurses Association

TENA is a nonprofit organization that has local chapters of emergency nurses throughout the state. The association offers continuing education programs, professional development opportunities and scholarships.

Texas Nurses Association

The Texas Nurses Association is the leading professional association for registered nurses from all specializations in the state of Texas. Through its legislative agenda, political action work, educational programs, networking events, and conferences, the TNA supports the training, professional development and career advancement of nurses in the state.

Texas Nurse Practitioners

Founded in 1988, the TNP works with and for nurse practitioners in the state. The membership-based organization offers a range of services including student memberships, continuing education programs, grassroots legislative efforts, and a career center.

Texas Organization of Nurse Executives

The Texas Organization of Nurse Executives is an organization for nursing administrators and executives that provides a united voice, access to networking opportunities, and insights into health care industry trends.

Texas School Nurses Organization

TCNO is an affiliate of the National Association of School Nurses. The organization offers continuing education programs, and hosts events and conferences for its members working in school nursing roles throughout the state.